Posts Tagged ‘Air National Guard’

Former FBI Chief Ted Gunderson Speaks out against Chemtrails

by Greg Hedgepath on Sunday, January 23rd, 2011

This is article 1 of 2 in the topic Chemtrails
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Former FBI Chief, Ted L. Gunderson, makes a statement regarding the chemtrail “death dumps”, otherwise know as air crap, on January 12, 2011. Ted says the following:

“The death dumps, otherwise known as chemical trails, are being dropped and sprayed throughout the United States and England, Scotland, Ireland, and Northern Europe. I have personally seen them not only in the United States, but in Mexico and in Canada. Birds are dying around the world. Fish are dying by the hundreds of thousands around the world.

This is genocide. This is poison. This is murder by the United Nations. This element within our society that is doing this must be stopped. I happen to know of two of the locations where the airplanes are that dump this crap on us. Four of the planes are out of the Air National Guard in Lincoln, Nebraska. And, the other planes are out of Fort Sill, Oklahoma. I personally have observed the planes that were standing still in Nebraska – Lincoln, Nebraska – at the Air National Guard. They have no markings on them. They are huge, bomber-like airplanes with no markings. This is a crime: a crime against humanity, a crime against America, a crime against the citizens of this great country. The must be stopped.

WHAT IS WRONG WITH CONGRESS? This has an affect on their population, and their people, and their friends, and their relatives, and themselves. What’s wrong with them? What’s wrong with the pilots who are flying these airplanes and dumping this crap, this poison, on their own families? Somebody has to do something about it. Somebody in Congress has to step forward and stop it now. Thank you. I’m Ted Gunderson.” For more details, visithttp://www.aircrap.org.

January 20, 2011 by Infowars Ireland ircraporg | January 13, 2011

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Just Who Are They Protecting?

by Bob Livingston on Wednesday, July 21st, 2010

For recording this video with his helmet camera of an irate and possibly out-of-control State Trooper, 25-year-old Maryland Air National Guard staff sergeant Anthony Graber is facing 16 years in prison.

Graber was cut off in traffic and stopped by the gun-wielding plainclothes officer after speeding down Interstate 95 in Maryland on his motorcycle. He was, rightly, charged with speeding. But state police didn’t like the fact that Graber posted his video on YouTube.

So in April state police raided his parents’ home in Abingdon, Md., and confiscated his camera, computer and external hard drives. Then he was indicted on a charge of violating state wiretap laws by recording the trooper.

Many of us were raised with the idea that the police are there to protect us. But the proliferation of hand-held recording devices is proving true what petty criminals, blacks and other minorities have maintained for years: All too often those sworn to protect us are nothing more than abusive, power-mad thugs with the authority of the state behind their actions.

And since the state doesn’t like it when its officers are made to look bad, the state is now twisting the original intent of wiretap laws to make everyone carrying a cell phone into a possible criminal.

Miami journalist Carlos Miller, who runs the blog “Photography Is Not a Crime” told ABC News he has documented at least 10 such arrests since he started keeping track in 2007. Miller himself has been arrested twice. One case he won on appeal and the other was thrown out after the officer twice failed to appear in court.

So what we are learning is it is perfectly okay for police officers to record their encounters with suspects using dash cameras in their patrol cars and hidden cameras in their interrogation rooms, but if a citizen being accosted by police or witnessing police abuse records the incident the state will treat him like he’s John Dillinger.

So much for the idea of “To protect and serve.”

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Why you’ll someday fly the friendly skies without a pilot

by Terrence Aym on Saturday, July 3rd, 2010

What began as pilotless, robot aircraft for the military has graduated to a program designed to explore the feasibility of uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAVs) sharing airspace with piloted civilian planes.

Recently, a Boeing subsidiary called Insitu was commissioned along with the New Jersey Air National Guard to explore the ways that UAVs could successfully share civilian skies.

Aviation experts see this as the first step towards the automated airliners of tomorrow-a feature of some speculative pulp fiction of the 1920s and the popular dream of many 20th Century futurists.

Across the pond, the UK has also embarked on a program researching the possibility of crewless commercial aircraft. Led by BAE Systems and EADS (the owner of European aircraft conglomerate Airbus), Astraea 2 seeks its own pathway to a pilotless future.

Currently, airspace over North America and Europe is cleared for special UAV flights. The goal of the American and UK project is to eliminate the need to clear certain altitudes and vectors to accommodate pilotless craft.

According to the FAA and aircraft control officials, the ability of UAVs to fly without special restrictions will free up time and allow more frequent flights.

Expediency, however, is not taking a back seat to safety. The UAVs will have to be ‘smart’ aircraft with the ability to sense other planes, change altitude, speed and direction if needed, and execute evasive maneuvers if another aircraft approaches too closely.

All airliners and most cargo operations are linked into a computerized, co-operative network called the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS). For UAV air traffic to operate efficiently and safely, they will have to be part of the system as well.

While the TCAS will work for many flights, some aircraft—especially private aviation craft—may not be linked into the system and therefore would give no electronic warning to the UAVs. To accommodate low profile aircraft, or silent planes, the team working on the UK Astraea 2 is creating multiple sensors such as micro-radars, infra-red detectors and high resolution, low light optical cameras to guarantee the detection of nearby aircraft.

Once remotely piloted craft are a normal part of air traffic, aviation researchers expect the next leap forward will carry pilotless aircraft into the air cargo business. Eventually, FedEx, UPS, DHL and the rest will operate mostly UAV cargo flights. Some see this happening before 2020.

Replacing airborne pilots with remote flight technicians on the ground can save hundreds of millions of dollars.

Mary Cummings at MIT is exploring methods of automating basic aviation systems. She explains, “The cargo airlines want very much to lose their pilots. The money that would be saved in salary and benefits, including retirement and health care costs, is pretty staggering.”

Yet even reliable systems like the TCAS can sometimes fail. A TCAS failure worries people like system engineer Peter Ladkin whose field is safety-critical technological systems. “Flying UAVs in civilian airspace, and mandating safety devices for them and their airspace co-users, has large, maybe even overwhelming, political, legal and social dimensions,” he said.

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