Archive for the ‘Survival’ Category

Living Outside The System And Preparing For Coming Collapse

by Bob Livingston on Monday, November 4th, 2013

This is article 372 of 392 in the topic economy
Living Outside The System And Preparing For Coming Collapse

PHOTOS.COM

I have written to you many times over the years about food storage and owning some junk silver coins. (U.S. coins minted before 1965 that are 90 percent silver.)

Also, if possible, we should own some small gold coins and have some cash currency, at least enough for 90 days or more.

For sure, we need some guns suited for each member of the family. Each family member should become familiar with his gun and have extra ammunition for each gun.

Barter items are also very important. Use your imagination here. There are many ideas on this such as coffee, dried food such as beans, cigarettes, canned sardines, canned tuna, sugar and stevia, salt, rice, tea, canned soups, cleaning products, soap products, food bars, basic patent medicines, your prescription medicines and many more. A good source for vacuum-packed food is the Mormons.

Living outside the system means total independence from all government and everyday grocery stores and pharmacies. Even your power source (public utilities) should be backed up with a gas or other fuel generator.

We almost certainly face a black depression or a total collapse, and very few people are ready. Why? Most people are so accustomed to the easy life with everything at their fingertips that they cannot imagine a crash of the system leaving people desperate. It is much better to be prepared with the items mentioned above. So what if you lose some food along the way? You can say that you had some insurance. No time to worry about this.

We won’t quit living and enjoying life because we take some money and buy food and emergency supplies. But we will feel more secure. Do not discuss your storage project with anybody.

The breakdown of the system should now be visible to everybody. Government is failing at every level, along with the collapse of morality. In the final stages of any government, there is a breakdown of morality and work ethic. Society becomes “dog-eat-dog.” This is visible now.

Of course, we must remember that the basic cause of the collapse of any government is its currency debasement. This is all too evident in the United States today.

The U.S. is past life support of borrowing money. We live on printing press money. It’s past the runaway stage.

You remember the crash of the housing bubble in 2008? Continued artificially low interest rates by the Federal Reserve are causing a repeat of that malinvestment-fueled calamity. Those who study the charts are seeing housing numbers that “are reminiscent of 2005 and 2006.”

The home price affordability index as tracked by the National Association of Realtors has been below its long-term trend line for four months now. Three economists from Robert Morris University say that history shows this means a housing bubble is in place. Bubbles inevitably collapse.

Worse is the indication that the United States is now in a hyperinflationary phase. The U.S. dollar is on perilous ground.

It took the United States more than 200 years to reach $8 trillion in “debt.” Since 2006, when helicopter Ben Bernanke began his reckless money printing spree, U.S. “debt” has more than doubled and now stands at $17 trillion.

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Something in the air

by Douglas J. Hagmann on Monday, October 15th, 2012

This is article 244 of 594 in the topic Gun Rights

I attended a gun show yesterday morning, just over a quarter-century after attending my first and only gun show. The first venue was located less than a mile from the current venue. Despite the passage of time, the memories of attending my first event remain surprisingly fresh in my mind. I still recall many of the people and conversations from my first event, as well as the sights, sounds and even the “feel” of that particular gun show.

Attending the event yesterday was like seeing an acquaintance I had not seen in 26 years. I’m certain you know the feeling I am attempting to describe. Perhaps it might be an old flame, or someone you once worked with, or maybe even a distant relative. Over time, you retain a mental image of that person, their appearance the last time you saw them, as well as their voice and even their demeanor. You remember them the way they were the last time you saw and interacted with them. Then, you meet them again and are awestruck by their subtle and not-so-subtle changes.

In the autumn of 1986, I recall listening to gun show attendees talking with the vendors. Most of the discussions revolved around hunting in the hills of northwestern Pennsylvania, selecting the best gun for hunting deer, turkey and other wild game. At that time, many of the attendees were talking about their previous year’s hunting exploits, comparing notes about the best hunting spots and boasting about the different ways they cooked the venison for their families.

Twenty six years later, the conversations were as different as the atmosphere at the event. Largely absent was the talk about hunting, venison recipes, and deer stands. I observed hundreds of men (and many women) of all ages slowly walking through the aisles created by the booths of gun vendors and survival items. I mingled with as many as I could, attempting to listen to their hushed conversations. I struck up conversations with more than a dozen attendees, and asked open ended questions to assess their moods and mindsets. Like that old acquaintance not seen for over two-and-a-half decades, the changes were stark and dramatic.

“Something’s coming”

Over the course of three hours, I spoke with a total of fourteen men (attendees) and two vendors. I deliberately kept the conversations casual and the questions general. My primary questions involved asking the attendees why they were attending, and if they were going to (or already had) purchased anything. I posed my questions informally, as just another person at the event.

Every person I spoke to told me they were there to buy a gun, another gun, and/or look for bargains for ammunition. With the exception of one man, every person I spoke with said they were there to look at or buy weapons and/or ammunition for self-defense. The sole exception was not really an exception at all, as he stated that he already had all he needed for self defense and was there to purchase a more comfortable holster for concealed carry purposes.

I can best describe the mood of the people I spoke with was somber, although that might not be the best adjective to use.

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A Suggested Survival List

by Chuck Baldwin on Thursday, August 30th, 2012

This is article 10 of 10 in the topic Survival

It’s once again time for my annual survival list column. One does not have to be a prophet to know that we are on the precipice of some potentially catastrophic–or at the very least, challenging–days. In fact, most of us are already in challenging days, and some are already enduring catastrophic events. That is, if one would call being out of work, losing one’s home, facing life-threatening medical conditions without any prospect of medical insurance, several families being forced to live in one house due to homes being foreclosed, etc., catastrophic.

The potential for an escalation of cataclysmic events, however, is very real. Only a “blooming idiot” would call someone who attempts to prepare for “the day of adversity” a Chicken Little now. Anyone who does not see the storm clouds on the horizon isn’t paying attention.

For example, can one imagine what would happen if Russia or China launched a nuclear attack against the United States? (Once again, I encourage readers to watch the CBS TV series “Jericho” to get an idea of how quickly life, and even civilization, could change.) Imagine if there was another 9/11-type event. What would happen if some form of Zimbabwe-style inflation hit the US? What would happen if anything disrupted the distribution of Welfare checks, or food to local grocers? Imagine a Hurricane Katrina-style natural disaster in your town. I think people everywhere are beginning to awaken to just how vulnerable we all really are.

As a result, people from virtually every walk of life have asked my thoughts on how they should prepare. Therefore, I will, again, attempt to share with my readers some of the counsel I have given these folks.

First, a disclaimer. I am not an economist; I am not a survival expert; I am not a firearms expert; I am not an attorney; I am not a physician. In fact, I am not an expert in anything! For several years, however, I have tried to learn from others. I am an avid reader. My work has allowed me to travel extensively. In fact, I have logged over 150,000 miles crisscrossing this great country over the last few years. I have had the privilege of sitting at the feet of–and learning from–many of America’s most learned, most trained, and most qualified “experts” in a variety of fields. What I write today, I have learned from others. I’ve formed my own opinions and priorities, of course, but everything I’m sharing has been said, or written about, before. But if I can share something in today’s column that will help someone be better prepared for the days to come, then my goal will have been achieved.

Location:

Analyze your living conditions. Where do you live? Do you live in an urban or rural environment? Is it a big city or small town? Do you live in an apartment or condominium? How close are your neighbors? Do you even know your neighbors? Would you trust them if the electricity was off and they were hungry? Could you grow your own food if you had to? How easily could you secure your home? If you live in a cold weather environment, how long could you stay warm without electricity? These are the kinds of questions you need to ask yourself now.

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GUN CONTROL: CITY OF HOUSTON’S CODIFIED COWARDICE … “RUN, HIDE, FIGHT”

by Stephen Levine on Saturday, July 28th, 2012

This is article 208 of 594 in the topic Gun Rights

Contrary to popular political pandering, a hero is not someone who does his job quietly and efficiently under adverse conditions.

A hero is the person who knowingly faces life-threatening danger bravely and with courage; who proceeds to take extreme action to save other lives at the risk of his own. Not running nor hiding … but taking affirmative, forceful action which saves the lives of others.

Traditionally, a coward is one who sees the very same danger and runs or hides while others remain at risk. It should be noted that there is honor in leading others to safety and that true warriors accept that there is a big difference between a strategic retreat to muster one’s forces in able to return to battle and just running away.

Apparently the Department of Homeland Security has financed a City of Houston video which would have many Texans rolling over in their graves …

DHS-funded video gives tips to survive a shooter

After last week’s shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., the city of Houston has released a how-to video on surviving a shooter event. The video was created with funds from the Homeland Security Department.

Entitled “Run, Hide, Fight,” the video depicts a fictional shooting incident at an office building.

Many Texans, the epitome of hard-scrabble fighters, must be hanging their head in shame as their city suggests that the best course of action is to Run, Hide – or as a very last resort – Fight.

The City of Houston’s website offers these tips:

  • Run if a safe path is available. Always try and escape or evacuate even if others insist on staying.
  • Encourage others to leave with you but don’t let the indecision of others slow down your own effort to escape.
  • Once you are out of the line of fire, try to prevent others from walking into the danger zone and call 9-1-1.
  • If you can’t get out safely, find a place to hide.
  • When hiding, turn out lights, remember to lock doors and silence your ringer and vibration mode on your cell phone As a last resort, working together or alone, act with aggression, use improvised weapons and fight.

All good advice for the average citizen as far as it goes.

As a last resort? Use improvised weapons?

Texans are noted for their respect for the Constitution’s Second Amendment and their right of self-defense. If any state gets gun issues mostly right, it is Texas.

  • There is no waiting period for purchasing a firearm in the state of Texas.
  • There is no state registration of firearms.
  • With proper licensing (Concealed Handgun License) you may carry a pistol or revolver on your person so long as it remains concealed. Long guns (rifles / shotguns) do not have to be concealed, but must be carried in a manner not calculated to cause alarm, and do not require a license.
  • Open carry is not legal in Texas, but you may open carry on your own property, in the commission of a sporting activity (competition, shooting ranges, etc.), and while engaged in hunting.
  • You may carry a firearm in your car. With the passage of the Motorist Protection Act you may now readibly carry handguns, loaded and within reach, so long as you conceal the firearm.

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Self Reliance and Surviving the Government Zombie Crisis

by Christopher Morris on Thursday, January 26th, 2012

This is article 9 of 10 in the topic Survival

Catchy little title, no? People love zombies and they dig survival topics. Via my sublime understanding of SEO as a web sewer magician I will attempt to lure the bored screen tapper into perusing over 1,000 nicely arranged collection of words.

I believe this country is in trouble economically, socially and politically. That is no secret. The question is what to do about it. I have been hoarding gold, silver, food, water, guns and bullets. Big deal. Prudent people have enough food and water on hand to get through any emergencies that come what may. Prudent people save their money and diversify. Prudent people protect their family and property.

There used to be a time, not too long ago actually, when people in this country were Pioneers. They lived off the land, grew their own food, built their own shelters, cut their own wood, hunted and fished. They were self sufficient. They hoarded food by necessity. My grandparents shopped sparingly at the grocery store once a month. They canned food. Had a couple of deep freezers full of frozen treats. The grew a lovely garden and had half ownership of a farm.

There are some people who are returning to that life of self-sufficiency. Some never left. These folks will be perfectly fine if a financial collapse cometh.

Then you have the zombies. The people that you will be shooting in the face off your front doorstep as they are scrounging for food. These folks buy just enough to get them through the next pay check. They eat out virtually every meal. They are screwed because they believe the system, the government, will take care of them.

Then, of course, you have those that are losing their minds. I enjoy reading “prepper” blogs. They are vastly entertaining for the fantasy life many engage in writing about. Understand that I believe in preparation. What I don’t care to involve myself in is Mad Max apocalyptic fantasies. Have you read “The Road”? Not pleasant. Denzel Washington is cool as hell in “The Book of Eli”. Your post-apocalyptic life won’t be nearly as awesome.

Preppers talk about “bugging out”. Sounds great until you think….where? OK, sure if I lived in an urban cesspool then I would be thinking about where to go and how to get there in the event of mob rule. Which I don’t discount is coming. Thing is, if you live in the city then you are most likely already a zombie and will be roving around until you get to my front doorstep upon which I’ll have to shoot you in the face.

Preppers talk about all the things they need to survive. The list of items they think they must have to survive when the SHTF. Well, from what I’ve read you’d need a house to store it all in. Are you going to put three rooms worth of survival gear on your back or stuffed in your car? Get real.

Some have a groovy cabin in the middle of nowhere. Great if you live out West. Maybe the roads won’t be too crowded on your pilgrimage to your hideout. If you’re East of the Mississippi then I wonder how you are going get to it with the over-crowded roads.

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A Suggested Survival List

by Chuck Baldwin on Thursday, October 20th, 2011

It’s once again time for my annual survival list column. One does not have to be a prophet to know that we are on the precipice of some potentially catastrophic–or at the very least, challenging–days. In fact, most of us are already in challenging days, and some are already enduring catastrophic events. That is, if one would call being out of work, losing one’s home, facing life-threatening medical conditions without any prospect of medical insurance, several families being forced to live in one house due to homes being foreclosed, etc., catastrophic.

The potential for an escalation of cataclysmic events, however, is very real. Only a “blooming idiot” would call someone who attempts to prepare for “the day of adversity” a Chicken Little now. Anyone who does not see the storm clouds on the horizon isn’t paying attention.

For example, can one imagine what would happen if terrorists nuked a major American city or cities? (Once again, I encourage readers to watch the CBS TV series “Jericho” to get an idea of how quickly life, and even civilization, could change.) Imagine if there was another 9/11-type event. What would happen if some form of Zimbabwe-style inflation hit the US? What would happen if anything disrupted the distribution of Welfare checks, or food to local grocers? Imagine a Hurricane Katrina-style natural disaster in your town. I think people everywhere are beginning to awaken to just how vulnerable we all really are.

As a result, people from virtually every walk of life have asked my thoughts on how they should prepare. Therefore, I will, again, attempt to share with my readers some of the counsel I have given these folks.

First, a disclaimer. I am not an economist; I am not a survival expert; I am not a firearms expert; I am not an attorney; I am not a physician. In fact, I am not an expert in anything! For several years, however, I have tried to learn from others. I am an avid reader. My work has allowed me to travel extensively. I have had the privilege of sitting at the feet of–and learning from–many of America’s most learned, most trained, and most qualified “experts” in a variety of fields. What I write today, I have learned from others. I’ve formed my own opinions and priorities, of course, but everything I’m sharing has been said, or written about, before. But if I can share something in today’s column that will help someone be better prepared for the days to come, then my goal will have been achieved.

Location:

Analyze your living conditions. Where do you live? Do you live in an urban or rural environment? Is it a big city or small town? Do you live in an apartment or condominium? How close are your neighbors? Do you even know your neighbors? Would you trust them if the electricity was off and they were hungry? Could you grow your own food if you had to? How easily could you secure your home? If you live in a cold weather environment, how long could you stay warm without electricity? These are the kinds of questions you need to ask yourself now.

Over the past several decades, masses of people have migrated into large metropolitan areas.

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2 Things Will Survive a Nuclear Holocaust: Cockroaches and Porn

by Doug Powers on Friday, September 16th, 2011

I’ll bet your grandfather never thought of this when he was digging the family nuke shelter in the backyard in 1953… or maybe he did for all I know:

LOS ANGELES (CBS) — A San Fernando Valley adult entertainment studio began construction this month on what it calls a “post-apocalyptic” underground bunker in anticipation of a global catastrophe rumored to take place in late 2012.

A spokesman for Van Nuys-based Pink Visual said the bunker will be “far more than a mere bomb shelter or subterranean survivalist enclave” with amenities such as multiple fully-stocked bars, an enormous performing stage and a sophisticated content production studio.

“Our goal is nothing less than to survive the apocalypse to come in comfort and luxury,” said Pink Visual spokesman Quentin Boyer.

I think The Onion was the first to propose a similar idea.

Reports say the adult entertainment apocalypse shelter will hold 1,200 to 1,500 people. On the downside, you’ll have to live out your remaining years locked in a bunker watching Charlie Sheen tuck $50 bills into the g-string of a stripper named Gigi Geigercounter.

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Defending Your Life

by John Myers on Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

This is article 8 of 10 in the topic Survival
Defending Your Life

PHOTOS.COM Learn to defend yourself. Study judo, wrestling or mixed martial arts -- anything that involves actual physical contact.

Sometimes, we are in danger because we are in the wrong place at the wrong time. Knowing what to do to avoid such a situation, or what you must do if you cannot, can be a lifesaver.

As a child, I was bullied, and I took more than my share of beatings in the schoolyard. I grew out of that stage and became a satisfactory football player. But I was never confident that I could defend myself.

At 17, I spent a year taking karate lessons. The conditioning part of it was fine, but part of me knew it was a waste of time. There was never any contact, and our sensei taught us that we had to pull our punches. In football we were taught to tackle through the opponent, so I knew there was something amiss.

Later, I spent a lot of years in the weight room. Even as I got stronger, I never had confidence. I decided to go back to traditional karate classes when I was 30. The kata movements that were taught were more choreographed dance steps.

Each day driving home from work, I would pass Matt David’s kickboxing gym. I finally mustered up the courage to go in.

Matt David was an imposing man. He owned a Spartan Gym in the rough area of town, along East Sprague in Spokane, Wash. Matt had a regulation boxing ring at the center of the gym. Surrounding it were speed bags, heavy bags and a mirrored wall. In the evenings, the Lilac City Boxing Club would train there.

I was not so impressed that Matt David had a 7th dan black belt in traditional kenpo karate, a rank he was awarded from the renowned Ed Parker. What impressed me most was that Matt had been an all-state wrestler in high school and was a former two-time California Golden Gloves heavyweight boxing champion.

When I first sat down with Matt, he asked me if I had any martial arts experience. I told him I had spent a couple of years in karate.

“That’s too bad,” he said. “But I can teach you to lose those bad habits.”

So began the school of hard knocks. No longer did I wear a white gi with a belt around my waist. Instead I wore tennis shoes, shorts, a T-shirt, hand wraps and a molded mouthpiece.

Our training was broken into two parts. First, we did calisthenics, hit the bags and shadow boxed. Then, we sparred in the ring with 16-ounce gloves, wearing full protective headgear.

I learned two things: that I didn’t know how to throw a punch and, more important, I didn’t know how to take a one. I dreaded getting in the ring against experienced fighters, but I was willing to pay that price.

That first summer at the gym, I took some tough rounds and suffered a couple of concussions. After one tough round, the head coach for the Lilac City Boxing Club, Dan Vassar Sr., approached me.

“Are you getting tired of getting beat up?” he asked.

At age 34, I joined the boxing club. I started training five days a week.

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Creating A Safe Room

by Bob Livingston on Monday, January 10th, 2011

This is article 6 of 10 in the topic Survival

Creating A Safe Room

In the event of a chemical, biological or radiological attack, a safe room is essential to survival. The safe room should ideally be a room in the interior of the home. If no interior room is available, choose one with as few external walls and windows as possible. An adjoining bathroom is also desirable.

To prepare the room, buy enough of the following to cover all windows and doors to the safe room area:

  • Weatherstripping.
  • Clear plastic sheeting at least 1 mil thick, preferably clear, and wide enough to cover windows.
  • Scissors or other cutting tool.
  • Duct tape.
  • Caulk and caulk gun.
  • Staple gun
  • A portable HEPA (High Efficiency Particle Arresting) air filtration device.

So your room will be ready when you need it, go ahead and install the weather stripping on your windows and doors, making sure the seal eliminates the transfer of air from outside into your home. Check around your windows for gaps, and caulk those as necessary. Also check for any other places where air might transfer like holes cut into walls or floors for the television cables and telephone wires. If you find those areas you should caulk them as well.

When installing the plastic sheeting, use the staple gun and/or duct tape to hang it. In places where you use the staple gun, be sure to cover the staples with duct tape to seal off any holes or tears in the plastic.

You should also be sure you have access from your safe room to your stored food and water, or bring as much as possible into your room before you seal it off, since you don’t know how long you may have to be sealed inside.

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Have Proper Clothing For Your Survival Situation

by Bob Livingston on Wednesday, January 5th, 2011

This is article 7 of 10 in the topic Survival

Have Proper Clothing For Your Survival Situation

Clothing is an item oft-overlooked when people begin preparing for a survival scenario. But, Jack Spigarelli notes in his Crisis Preparedness Handbook, surviving without the civilized comforts we’ve become accustomed to places a burden on the clothes we wear.

So Spigarelli recommends setting aside enough ready-to-wear clothing, or the fabric and materials to make it, to last at least one year.

He recommends good quality outdoor clothing such as that made by Filson, Pendleton or Woolrich. He writes that tightly woven fabric is more snag and tear resistant and wears longer. However, loosely woven fabrics are warmer.

Natural fabrics like wool and cotton are more absorbent, and wool retains its insulating properties even when wet. But synthetics have greater strength, resist abrasion and mildew better and dry more quickly. Gore-Tex and similar fabrics, which are waterproof but breathable, are essential, and fleece items are important to have, Spigarelli writes.

In his book, Spigarelli has a table of the basic clothing needs for one person for one year. He recommends adapting the list to age, sex, climate and lifestyle, but it is a great reference for a starting point. Here’s what he says you need:

  • Eight sets underwear (two long)
  • One pajamas or nightgown
  • One warm robe
  • Two t-shirts
  • Two cotton turtle-neck shirts
  • One straw hat
  • One knit cap or balaclava
  • One heavy-duty work belt
  • One pair suspenders
  • One or two sweaters
  • Two pair leather work gloves
  • One pair winter gloves, mittens or inserts
  • Two pair work shoes or boots
  • One pair waterproof boots/overshoes
  • Two pair shoelaces per pair of shoes
  • 12 pair socks (eight light, four heavy)
  • Four pair of jeans, pants, overalls
  • One pair heavy wool pants
  • Two to four work shirts (chambray, etc.)
  • Two cotton flannel shirts (chamois, etc.)
  • Two heavy wool shirts
  • One water-repellant windbreaker
  • One winter work coat
  • One heavy-duty parka

For shoes, be sure they are well-fitting and broken it. It won’t do to don a new pair and then set out on a bug-out that requires you to walk many miles. Your feet will be protesting quickly.

And don’t forget to store foot powder. And keep a supply of moleskin in your first-aid kit to help with blisters and other foot sores.

And one final tip; wear a thin pair of socks over a thicker pair to help avoid blisters if you’re going to be on your feet for a long time.

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